Michelle Tea Shrine

Rose of No Man's Land by Michelle Tea

Rose of No Man's Land by Michelle Tea
Paperback: 320 pages
Publisher: Mariner Books; Reprint edition (February 5, 2007)
Language: English
ISBN-10: 0156030934
ISBN-13: 978-0156030939
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Rose of No Man's Land by Michelle Tea



Kindle
File Size: 378 KB
Print Length: 324 pages
Publisher: MP Publishing Limited (August 6, 2009)
Sold by: Amazon Digital Services, Inc.
Language: English
ASIN: B002LISCAO


Hardcover: 306 pages
Publisher: MacAdam/Cage; First Edition edition (April 25, 2006)
Language: English
ISBN-10: 1596921609
ISBN-13: 978-1596921603
View Full Size
Rose of No Man's Land by Michelle Tea



Paperback: 320 pages
Publisher: Mariner Books (February 5, 2007)
Language: English
ISBN-10: 0156030934
ASIN: B001PO68BA
View Full Size
Rose of No Man's Land by Michelle Tea

Fourteen-year-old Trisha Driscoll is a gender-blurring, self-described loner whose family expects nothing of her. While her mother lies on the couch in a hypochondriac haze and her sister aspires to be on The Real World, Trisha struggles to find her own place among the neon signs, theme restau­rants, and cookie-cutter chain stores of her hometown.

After being hired and abruptly fired from the most popular clothing shop at the local mall, Trisha befriends a chain-smoking misfit named Rose, and her life shifts into manic overdrive. A “postmillennial, class-adjusted My So-Called Life (Publishers Weekly), Rose of No Man's Land is brim­ming with snarky observations and soulful musings on contemporary teenage America.

Book Reviews
From Publishers Weekly
Starred Review. Tea follows up her Lambda Award–winning San Francisco prostitution memoir, Valencia (2000), her sporadically transcendent collected poems, The Beautiful (2003), and last year's graphic novel, Rent Girl (now in development for TV), with this inspired queer bildungsroman. In Trisha Driscoll, Tea has developed an unreliable narrator who stands on her own. Trisha is a doughy, alcoholic 10th-grade denizen of Mogsfield, Mass., a fictional white trash nowhere. Her father is long gone; her mother, owing to psychosomatic back problems, does not leave the couch; her mother's boyfriend, Donnie, enters the kitchen only to make ramen; her younger sister, Kristy, is obsessed with launching herself onto reality TV and constantly films the family dysfunctioning around her. The first half of the novel establishes Trisha's grim bedroom-to-mall despair. In the second, a new friend, Rose, a fry cook who looks 12 appears, and the two go on a crystal meth–fueled adventure with blissful highs and crashing lows. Tea is brilliant in making the stakes for Trisha abundantly clear as she discovers sex (and, concurrently, her sexuality), drugs and the emotional gains and losses attendant to each. Add in minor characters like the never-seen but oft-discussed Kim Porciatti and various dumb guys in cars, and you have a postmillennial, class-adjusted My So-Called Life. (Feb. 14)
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

From Bookmarks Magazine
Following on the heels of her graphic novel Rent Girl (2005), the award-winning Valencia (2001), about San Francisco prostitution, and The Beautiful (2003), a collection of poetry, Rose of No Man's Land is Tea's first novel. Critics describe it as raw, honest, confident, hilarious, unpretentious, cynical, and poignant and agree that among coming-of-age novels, Tea's voice rings true. Narrated by Trisha, the novel takes place over one day, which stretched credibility for some critics. Yet Tea's first-person narrator and defiant sidekick, as well as her fantastic observations of pop culture, won critics over. Notes the San Francisco Chronicle: "Trisha refuses to become a poster child for what is wrong with youth today, and instead becomes what is most important of all, herself."
Copyright © 2004 Phillips & Nelson Media, Inc. --This text refers to the Hardcover edition.

 

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