Poetry Kaleidoscope: Guide to Poetry

Pararhyme

Back | Poetry Guide Home | Up | Next

Pararhyme, also known as partial or imperfect rhyme is a term devised by the poet Edmund Blunden to describe a near rhyme in which the consonants in two words are the same, but the vowels are different. It is distinguished from half rhyme in that all the consonants should match rather than just the final ones.

Pararhyme is sometimes referred to as double consonance. It is a particular feature of the poetry of Wilfred Owen; see, for example Strange Meeting.

Examples

  • hall/hell
  • red/rid
  • pack/pick

See also


Poetry Guide Home | Up | Classification of Rhymes | Rhyme Scheme | Chain Rhyme | Eye Rhyme | Feminine Rhyme | Half Rhyme | Holorime | Internal Rhyme | Nursery Rhyme | Pararhyme | Sprung Rhythm | Triolet | Pruning Poem

Poetry Kaleidoscope: Guide to Poetry made by MultiMedia | Free content and software

This guide is licensed under the GNU Free Documentation License. It uses material from the Wikipedia.