Poetry Kaleidoscope: Guide to Poetry

Assonance

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Assonance is the repetition of vowel sounds within a short passage of verse or prose.

Assonance is more a feature of verse than prose. It is used in (mainly modern) English-language poetry, and is particularly important in Old French, Spanish and Celtic languages.

Willy Russell's eponymous student Rita described it as "getting the rhyme wrong".

Examples

  • Try to light the fire.
  • He gave a nod to the officer with the pocket.
  • fleet feet sweep by sleeping Greeks.
  • Hayden plays a lot.
  • "[E]very time I write a rhyme, thEse pEople think it's a crime" - Eminem, Criminal
  • I'm running up on someone's lawns with guns drawn. — Eminem Rock Bottom

See also


Poetry Guide Home | Up | Accent | Anacrusis | Assonance | Cæsura | Dissonance | Kennings | Meter | Rhyme | Stichomythia | Structural elements

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