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Poem Builder

The Poem Builder will show you 3 flip cards to help you build a poem.

  1. The first card reveals the subject of the poem, a spark to ignite the imagination.
  2. The second card suggests a poetic form, a structure within which to shape the words.
  3. And the third card offers a bounty of language, a treasure trove of words to be woven into the fabric of the poem.

Hover over each image below to reveal the choices:

Look below the flip cards for the poetic form definition and how-to.

Subject:

Write about:

The feel of grass between your toes

Poem Form:

In this format:

Found Poem

Definition: A found poem is a type of poetry that is created by taking words, phrases, or passages from existing texts and rearranging them to form a new poem. It is a way of re-purposing existing language to create new meaning and context.

How-to: Find a source text that speaks to you, whether it's a newspaper article, a novel, or a scientific report. Read through the text and mark any words, phrases, or passages that catch your attention. Begin to experiment with arranging these found words and phrases in a way that creates a new narrative or meaning. As you arrange the words, pay attention to the rhythm and sound of the language, and use line breaks, white space, and punctuation to create a sense of musicality and movement in the poem. A found poem is a collaboration between the original author and yourself. Permit the words to direct you and give them room to breathe in your rearrangement. Also, be mindful of the context of the original text and how it might add meaning or layers to your poem.

(definition below images)

Words:

Use these words:

  1. house
  2. eyes
  3. fog
  4. girls
  5. thirst
  6. vibrate
  7. spin
  8. tragic
  9. androgynous
  10. marble

Found Poem

Definition: A found poem is a type of poetry that is created by taking words, phrases, or passages from existing texts and rearranging them to form a new poem. It is a way of re-purposing existing language to create new meaning and context.

How-to: Find a source text that speaks to you, whether it's a newspaper article, a novel, or a scientific report. Read through the text and mark any words, phrases, or passages that catch your attention. Begin to experiment with arranging these found words and phrases in a way that creates a new narrative or meaning. As you arrange the words, pay attention to the rhythm and sound of the language, and use line breaks, white space, and punctuation to create a sense of musicality and movement in the poem. A found poem is a collaboration between the original author and yourself. Permit the words to direct you and give them room to breathe in your rearrangement. Also, be mindful of the context of the original text and how it might add meaning or layers to your poem.